We are Mathematicians. – Ms. Chan's Class Blog
 

We are Mathematicians.

Big Ideas: Development of computational fluency in addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers requires flexible decomposing and composing.

Term Two – Grade 2

Addition and subtraction facts to 20 (introduction of computational strategies)

  • adding and subtracting numbers to 20
  • fluency with math strategies for addition and subtraction (e.g., making or bridging 10, decomposing, identifying related doubles, adding on to find the difference)

Addition and subtraction to 100

  • decomposing numbers to 100
  • estimating sums and differences to 100
  • using strategies such as looking for multiples of 10, friendly numbers (e.g., 48 + 37, 37 = 35 + 2, 48 + 2 = 50, 50 + 35 = 85), decomposing into 10s and 1s and recomposing (e.g., 48 + 37, 40 + 30 = 70, 8 +7 = 15, 70 +15 = 85), and compensating (e.g., 48 + 37, 48 +2 = 50, 37 – 2 = 35, 50 + 35 = 80)
  • adding up to find the difference
  • using an open number line, hundred chart, ten-frames
  • using addition and subtraction in real-life contexts and problem-based situations
  • whole-class number talks

Multiple attributes of 2D shapes and 3D objects

  • sorting 2D shapes and 3D objects, using two attributes, and explaining the sorting rule
  • describing, comparing, and constructing 2D shapes, including triangles, squares, rectangles, circles
  • identifying 2D shapes as part of 3D objects
  • using traditional northwest coast First Peoples shapes (ovoids, U, split U, and local art shapes) reflected in the natural environment

Term Two – Grade 3

Addition and subtraction to 1000

  • using flexible computation strategies, involving taking apart (e.g., decomposing using friendly numbers and compensating) and combining numbers in a variety of ways, regrouping
  • estimating sums and differences of all operations to 1000
  • using addition and subtraction in real-life contexts and problem-based situations
  • whole-class number talks

Addition and subtraction facts to 20 (emerging computational fluency)

  • adding and subtracting of numbers to 20
  • demonstrating fluency with math strategies for addition and subtraction (e.g., decomposing, making and bridging 10, related doubles, and commutative property)
  • Addition and subtraction are related.
  • At the end of Grade 3, most students should be able to recall addition facts to 20.

Construction of 3D objects

  • identifying 3D objects according to the 2D shapes of the faces and the number of edges and vertices (e.g., construction of nets, skeletons)
  • describing the attributes of 3D objects (e.g., faces, edges, vertices)
  • identifying 3D objects by their mathematical terms (e.g., sphere, cube, prism, cone, cylinder)
  • comparing 3D objects (e.g., How are rectangular prisms and cubes the same or different?)
  • understanding the preservation of shape (e.g., the orientation of a shape will not change its properties)
  • jingle dress bells, bentwood box, birch bark baskets, pithouses

Time concepts

  • understanding concepts of time (e.g., second, minute, hour, day, week, month, year)
  • understanding the relationships between units of time
  • Telling time is not expected at this level.
  • estimating time, using environmental references and natural daily/seasonal cycles, temperatures based on weather systems, traditional calendar

 


Term One

The grade 3 curriculum: Fraction Concepts

Big Ideas:

  • Fractions are a type of number that can represent quantities.

Students are expected to know the following:

  • Fractions are numbers that represent an amount or quantity.
  • Fractions can represent parts of a region, set, or linear model.
  • Fraction parts are equal shares or equal-sized portions of a whole or unit.
  • Provide opportunities to explore and create fractions with concrete materials.
  • recording pictorial representations of fraction models and connecting to symbolic notation
  • equal partitioning
  • equal sharing, pole ratios as visual parts, medicine wheel, seasons

Number Concepts – Students are expected to know the following:

Big Ideas:

  • Numbers to 100 represent quantities that can be decomposed into 10s and 1s. (Gr. 2)
  • Numbers to 1000 represent quantities that can be decomposed into 100s, 10s and 1s. (Gr. 3)

The grade 2 curriculum: Number Concepts to 100

  • counting:
    • skip-counting by 2, 5, and 10:
      • using different starting points
      • increasing and decreasing (forward and backward)
  • Quantities to 100 can be arranged and recognized:
    • comparing and ordering numbers to 100
    • benchmarks of 25, 50, and 100
    • place value:
      • understanding of 10s and 1s
      • understanding the relationship between digit places and their value, to 99 (e.g., the digit 4 in 49 has the value of 40)
      • decomposing two-digit numbers into 10s and 1s
  • even and odd numbers
  • Benchmarks
    • seating arrangements at ceremonies/feasts of 25, 50, and 100 and personal referents

The grade 3 curriculum: Number Concepts to 1000

  • counting:
    • skip-counting by any number from any starting point, increasing and decreasing (i.e., forward and backward)
    • skip-counting is related to multiplication
    • investigating place-value based counting patterns (e.g., counting by 10s, 100s; bridging over a century; noticing the role of zero as a placeholder 698, 699, 700, 701; noticing the predictability of our number system)
  • Numbers to 1000 can be arranged and recognized:
    • comparing and ordering numbers
    • estimating large quantities
  • place value:
    • 100s, 10s, and 1s
    • understanding the relationship between digit places and their values, to 1000 (e.g., the digit 4 in 342 has the value of 40 or 4 tens)
    • understanding the importance of 0 as a place holder (e.g., in the number 408, the zero indicates that there are 0 tens)
  • instructional resource: Math in a Cultural Context, by Jerry Lipka

Patterns – Students are expected to know the following:

Big Ideas:

  • The regular change in increasing patterns can be identified and used to make generalizations. (Gr. 2)
  • Regular increases and decreases in patterns can be identified and used to make generalizations. (Gr. 3)

The grade 2 curriculum:

  • repeating and increasing patterns
    • exploring more complex repeating patterns (e.g., positional patterns, circular patterns)
    • identifying the core of repeating patterns (e.g., the pattern of the pattern that repeats over and over)
    • increasing patterns using manipulatives, sounds, actions, and numbers (0 to 100)

The grade 3 curriculum:

  • increasing and decreasing patterns using words and numbers, based on concrete experiences
    • creating patterns using concrete, pictorial, and numerical representations
    • representing increasing and decreasing patterns in multiple ways
    • generalizing what makes the pattern increase or decrease (e.g., doubling, adding 2)
  • pattern rules
    • from a concrete pattern, describing the pattern rule using words and numbers
    • predictability in song rhythm and patterns
    • Share examples of local First Peoples art with the class, and ask students to notice patterns in the artwork.

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